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1345
10 Days
Availability : Through March 2021
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Brazil has five major climatic subtypes: equatorial, tropical, semiarid, highland tropical, and temperate. In general, winter lasts from June to August, with the coldest temperatures south of Rio.

Summer runs December to March, with stifling humidity in the far south. Brief rains are common, given the tropical climate, but the dry interior has fewer months of heavy rainfall. The Amazon Basin is the wettest area, and near the mouth of the river it rains year-round. The heaviest rainfall is from December to May.

Around Recife, the wettest time is May to August. Further south in Rio, the wet season is November to April. From July to December, it is possible to drive to the Pantanal.

 

 

About Brazil Travel

Beaches: Among the most famous beaches in the world are Rio’s Copacabana and Ipanema beaches, but with thousands of miles of coastline. Brazil’s many beaches offer a menu of water sport activities including fishing, windsurfing, scuba diving, sailing and snorkeling.

Brasilia: It is the only city in the world built in the 20th century to be designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of the grand, linear architecture of its public buildings, gardens and avenues.

Ibitipoca Reserve: For three decades, this reserve has been an ecological project that has required acquiring dozens of properties in the surroundings. Now, Ibitipoca Reserve protects the Ibitipoca Park and extends through three mining municipalities: Lima Duarte, Bias Fortes and Santa Rita do Ibitipoca.

Iguassu Falls: Both the Brazilian and Argentinean sides of this magnificent horseshoe-shaped falls are designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site

 

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Itacare: Itacare sits at the mouth of the Rio de Contas on eastern Brazil’s Cocoa Coast. The town has a series of beautiful small cove beaches and other picturesque beaches along the coast.

Jericoacoara National Park: The park consists of blue lagoons, calm seas and huge sand dunes. The beach is hidden behind the dunes on the west coast of Jijoca de Jericoacoara.

Lencois Maranhenses National Park: This protected area on Brazil’s north Atlantic coast is known for its vast desert landscapes of tall, white sand dunes and seasonal rainwater lagoons, of which Lagoa Azul and Lagoa Bonita are two of the largest.

Ouro Preto: The ‘‘city of gold’ is encircled by mountains, this UNESCO World Heritage City reveals its masterful architectural style in the 1742 Governor’s Palace, exquisite colonial churches and planned gardens along cobblestone streets.

Pantanal: This vast wetland is a refuge for capybara, caiman, giant river otter and the rare marsh deer. A complex of aquatic and terrestrial environments, including rough arboreal ranges and forests that can be explored on horseback, in open vehicles and by boat.

Praia do Forte: The area is blessed with a pleasant tropical climate. A turtle sanctuary has seen generations of sea turtles return each year to lay their eggs. This is a good location to view humpback whales and explore coral reefs.

Recife & Olinda: Famous for its 17th-century architecture, It is one of the largest cities in Brazil. History buffs love these towns for the old quarters, ornate churches and even an Inquisition jail. Olinda, a UNESCO World Heritage City.

Rio de Janeiro: Rio de Janeiro is the most visited city in the southern hemisphere. From Copacabana Beach to Sugarloaf Mountain, Rio makes a grand impression. Atop Corcovado Mountain, the 36-m/120-ft. statue of Christ the Redeemer is listed as one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.

Salvador da Bahia: Salvador is noted for its cuisine, music and Portuguese colonial architecture. The old city center is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Sao Paulo: Founded in 1554, this is a

 

city on the move. It is the largest city in Brazil and the largest in the southern hemisphere. Greater Sao Paulo is ranked as the world’s 10th largest metropolis by population.

 

Best Times to Travel to Brazil

Festivals & Special Events

•Larger than the United States, Brazil has five major climatic subtypes: equatorial, tropical, semiarid, highland tropical, and temperate. In general, winter lasts from June to August, with the coldest temperatures south of Rio. Summer runs December to March with stifling humidity in the far south. Brief rains are common, given the tropical climate, but the dry interior has fewer months of heavy rainfall. The Amazon Basin is the wettest area, and near the mouth of the river it rains year round. The heaviest rainfall is from December to May. In the area of Recife, the wettest time is May to August. Further south in Rio, the wet season is November to April. From July to December, it is possible to drive the Pantanal.

Carnaval is a four-day celebration throughout much of the continent. From Saturday to Fat Tuesday, in keeping with the Catholic season of Lent, Rio is an unforgettable party of masked balls, parades with outrageously costumed revelers and fireworks.

The June Bonfire Festivals are an integral part of Brazilian culture. Throughout Rio, folklore celebrations take place in the form of games, dancing, fireworks and bonfires.

Reveillon, New Year’s Eve in Rio is an extravaganza when millions pack the beaches for an all-night festival of music, food and fireworks.

 

Experience(s)
  •  Adventure
  •  Culture, History & Arts
  •  Family Vacations
  •  Festivals & Events
  •  Food & Wine
  •  Islands & Beaches
  •  Romance, Weddings & Honeymoons
  •  Sightseeing
  •  Walking & Biking
  •  Wildlife & Nature

 

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About Big Five Tours & Expeditions

Since 1973, Big Five has created life-affirming journeys to some 44 destinations worldwide. Our Destination Specialists, award-winning adventures and premier 24-hour White Glove Service® guest assistance combine to present the journey of a lifetime to individuals, families and small groups. Sustainable travel is at the heart of Big Five. We have seen how the power of travel can change the world for the better. Sustainability benefits both the traveler and the places visited. Whether the focus is cultural, wildlife or adventure, we tailor each journey to the interests of guests traveling in Africa, Asia, Latin America and South Pacific.


Itinerary

Day 1: Rio de Janeiro / Paraty

Sophisticated Rio de Janeiro is the most visited city in the southern hemisphere.

Day 2: Paraty

The small colonial town center is a national historic monument with well-preserved buildings and four historic baroque churches.

Day 3: Paraty / Sao Paulo / Belo Horizonte

Belo Horizonte is the sixth-largest city in Brazil and still growing. It is also the first planned modern city in the country.

Day 4: Belo Horizonte / Brumadinho / Ouro Preto

In the small town of Brumadinho is Inhotim, a delightful surprise – an art museum and botanic garden that offers a stunning display of contemporary art.

Day 5: Ouro Preto

The “City of Gold” is a UNESCO World Heritage City of cobblestone streets, churches and terraced gardens.

Day 6: Tiradentes

One of the smallest yet best-preserved colonial towns in the Brazilian State of Minas Gerais.

Day 7: Tiradentes / Ibitipoca Reserve

Ibitipoca is a forested state park with an amazing array of birds, waterfalls, peaks, springs, caves and natural pools.

Days 8/9: Ibitipoca Reserve

This area has been transformed into Atlantic Forest, one of the most threatened biomes in the world, and a biodiversity hotspot with a variety of outdoors experiences.

Day 10: Ibitipoca Reserve / Rio de Janeiro / Depart

 

 

Custom Options

 

Beaches (3-4 days)

Giant dunes, secluded coves and rocky coasts offer activities from scuba diving to buggy rides on the dunes.

 

Brasilia (2 days)

Brazil’s futuristic capital was only envisioned in the late 1950s. Its grand architecture and planned gardens earned it recognition by UNESCO as World Heritage City.

 

Iguassu Falls (2 days)

This impressive natural wall of water encompasses some 150 to 300 waterfalls, depending on the water level and season.

 

Itacare (3 days)

Once a notorious hangout for pirates, today it is more likely to attract surfers and sunbathers with its great beaches.

 

Pantanal (4 days)

Pantanal’s wetlands are a vast refuge for capybara, caiman, tapir, monkeys, 600 species of birds and the elusive jaguar.

 

Praia do Forte (3 days)

A luxury spa, semi-deserted beaches, groves of coconut palms and a turtle sanctuary add up to more than just a beach retreat.

 

Recife & Olinda (3 days)

These towns are packed with history in atmospheric old quarters, ornate churches and an historic Inquisition jail.

 

Rio de Janeiro (3 days)

Rio offers a vast array of attractions from its beaches, to the famed Christ the Redeemer and Sugarloaf Mountain, to the annual Carnaval festival of parade floats, flamboyant costumes, samba dancers and, of course, parties.

 

Salvador da Bahia (4 days)

Colonial monuments contrast with African folk culture and history is on display at the colonial-era slave auction site.

  

Sao Paulo (2 days)

Already the tenth largest city in the world by GDP, cosmopolitan Sao Paulo is expected to become the sixth largest by 2025.

 

Trancoso (3 days)

This fishing village is not only famous for its beaches but also for the Trancoso’s Quadrado, its car-free, UNESCO-protected town square.

Pricing Terms and Conditions

Varies. Please inquire.

 

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